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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lets lay it all out there as this topic is always talked about.

1. They won't stop damage to the plastics all the time and they are not designed to.
2. There are thousands if not millions of physics variables in a crash so no two crashes are the same and you can't say frame sliders are great or bad based on a crash or two.
3. Frame sliders are designed to bend, grind, shatter, and twist as this is how they absorb energy and do not pass it on to the frame and engine.
4. A slider made too weak or too strong can cause damage to the frame or engine. Every crash is difference so this middle ground isn't the same for every crash so they try and find a balance where there is good middle ground for most crashes.

With that said race railz are made out of metal. They suck at absorbing energy and instaed they transfer it. They also can snag and catch on things and flip a bike.

Most frame sliders that are good are made out of delrin. Most any of the major brands work just fine. It's just as safeguard anyway.

There are cut and no cut frame sliders. Cut sliders require cutting a hole in your plastics or trimming the plastics in order to install the frame sliders. These normally are a more direct bolt on. In other words they are a piece of delrin with a hole in it and a bolt attaches it. Very direct and simple design. The no cut sliders often come with brackets. This is so that you don't have to cut your palstic. Yout bolt the bracket to the engine mount behind the plastics then the bracket moves around so that it pops out behind the plastics then you install the frame slider there. Some people swear by no cuts and they are normally a bit stronger, but you also have to remember that too strong can cause damage also. No cuts and cuts normally do very close to the same job. the nice thing about no cuts is that you leave your plastics stock so that if you sell the bike and the buyer doesn't like the sliders he can take them off without having a hole left in his plastics.

Imagine putting a metal rod that is 6" long to the outside of your helmet. You wouldn't want to crash and have that rod get shoved through your helmet. Metal transfers energy and doesn't absorb it. Now what if that rod was some delrin or even weaker plastics? it would absorb the energy and slow your head down before you fully met contact with the pavement. Stupid example I know but it gets the point across. The same is said for race cars. Everything blows apart when a race car hits the wall because it's not designed to stay attached to the cockpit of an f1 car. If it was then all the energy would be transfered. It's designed to have parts crush, rip off the cockpit, shatter, etc. this way the cockpit slows down before the cockpit and rider meet the wall.

This should cover most questions about sliders.

So you can't bash a pair of sliders because they didn't hold up because you might have had so much energy on the slider because the slider met the pavement first and if it didn't blow apart then it might have damaged your frame. You also can't say they are the best because they saved your ass in a crash. They are designed to save most people in most crashes, but with every crash different you might be in one of those categories where no frame slider would save your bike or just that type wouldn't. Depending on a crash the best frame slider in the world could be the worst for the crash and yet another crash could make the worst slider in the world the very best one for that crash.

Ride safe guys
 

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Senior Member
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That's a GREAT write-up! (sticky?)

I have the Woodcraft frame sliders (available from Motomummy ^). I like that the pucks screw onto the bolts from the side so that in the event of a crash a gnarled puck wont stop you from getting the thing off. I also like that the puck is mostly solid instead of having that hole in the middle for the bolt. I have not wrecked with them yet *here's hoping I never do*.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
yes some of them have removeable pucks like the woodcraft and LSL ones we sell. It's great if you have a slight tip over but remember that if you fall over hard it can also be a good idea to replace the bolt and bracket if they come with a bracket.

We'll be doing more write up's
wait till you see the rearset one i'm going to start on with pics and all...
 

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Brahptimus Prime
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My whole slider bent all the way through the mount when I went down. So like Corey says, it all depends on how you hit.

Motivation USA has great reviews, but it didn't really "slide" like it should have when I hit. It basically just bent the mount downward and possibly screwed up my frame, I still haven't cut/drilled it out yet.

There are so many variables in each wreck you can't depend on the slider to save it all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
plastic: some of the hardest sliders out there get great reviews as they normally won't get damaged in most situations, but they also can cause the most damage to some people. Look at race railz as well. Tons of people swear by them, but common sense says otherwise and some people have already jacked their frames up. When sliders that are a bit softer get worse reviews by most people when often they did what they were suppose to. Strength needs to be balanced...but you also can't judge a slider by any one or two crashes as there are so many variables that can change.
 

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Last year I had a cold tire slide the landed on the frame slider. Not a single piece of plastic got rubbed/scratched or anything. Just a bit of the slider ground off. I have Shogun sliders, but I've also seen someone just drop a bike and have the mount bend and damage the plastics. I'd rather have them then not.
 

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Grandevil said:
That's a GREAT write-up! (sticky?)

I have the Woodcraft frame sliders (available from Motomummy ^). I like that the pucks screw onto the bolts from the side so that in the event of a crash a gnarled puck wont stop you from getting the thing off. I also like that the puck is mostly solid instead of having that hole in the middle for the bolt. I have not wrecked with them yet *here's hoping I never do*.
Same here as well. 1st quality product imo.
 

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Senior Member
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584 Posts
On the Woodcraft and LSL's as mentioned can you take the puck off and then take the plastics off without removing the bolt that mounts it? I have Shoguns and when I need to drop the glass to service the bike I have to take the engine mount bolts out that the sliders are on. I know if you are careful etc you won't screw anything up but the bike I have already has a bit of a messed up thread. It would be great to remove the puck and be able to slid the fairing off of the bolt or whatever. Know of any sliders like this? Thanks.
 
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