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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tools needed:
3/8" drive 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 17mm sockets
3/8" drive ratchet
3/8" drive torque wrench
1/2" drive ratchet
1/2" drive breaker bar
1/2" drive torque wrench
36mm 1/2" drive socket
6mm hex head 3/8" drive socket
Chain breaker and rivet tool
Rear stand
Red Loctite
2' piece of 2"x4" wood

Directions:
1. Ok, so start off by removing the cotter pin/c-clip from the rear axle nut, and then loosen the rear axle nut.
2. Raise the bike up on the rear stand, and remove the shift rod and countershaft sprocket cover.
3. Now the countershaft sprocket should be exposed.
4. Remove the speed sensor rotor bolt from the center of the countershaft sprocket, which will fully expose the countershaft sprocket nut.
5. Take the piece of wood, and place it on top of the swingarm, between the swingarm and one of the spokes of the wheel.
6. Loosen the countershaft sprocket nut, this will require a decent amount of elbow grease.
7. Remove the piece of wood, and then the rear wheel. Turn the rear axle adjusters all the way in to the swingarm.
8. Remove the countershaft sprocket nut fully, and then remove the countershaft sprocket.
9. Break the old chain using your fancy chain breaker, and remove it.
10. Put the new countershaft sprocket on, making sure the splines line up properly and the washer is facing the correct direction. Do not attempt to torque it down just yet.
11. Remove the old rear sprocket from the rear wheel, and torque down the new one.
12. Put the rear wheel back on, sliding it forward as far as possible in the axle. Do not torque the rear axle nut yet.
13. Wrap the new chain around both sprockets, and measure where the chain will need to be cut.
14. Measure it again, making sure that you will be exposing one of the inside links that the new master link can be riveted on to.
15. Once you are confident in your measurement, go ahead and rivet the new chain together.
16. With the chain attached, pull the rear wheel as far back as you can, and then put the adjusters up against the axle blocks snugly.
17. Grab your piece of wood again, only this time put it under the swingarm, and between the swingarm and one of the spokes of the wheel.
18. Put some red Loctite on the countershaft, torque down the new countershaft sprocket, and then torque down the speed sensor rotor bolt.
19. Put the countershaft sprocket cover back on, as well as the shift rod.
20. Set your chain tension in the normal method, and you should be good to go! Remember, it is always better to run a little looser of a chain than too tight of a chain. I shoot for about 1.25"/1.5" worth of free chain slack.

now of course, this is the method and tools i use. i have done a few hundred sets of these, not only on my bikes but on friend's and customer's bikes as well. this is what works best and quickest for me, but everyone is different. so try it out, and take what you like from it.

 

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I just did mine, I didn't need the wood, i held the wheel from turning by holding my foot on the rear brake pedal.

Because i changes sprocket size in the rear i wanted to make sure i cut the chain to the correct length so i mocked it up and then adjusted it. It stayed at 110 links.

Held the chain in place and adjusted it. it was ok so this is the link i removed.


The hardest part for me was cleaning the crap out of the front sprocket cover area. Brakewash did the trick though.

Cleaned up.


I used Blue loctite, red is a pain in the azz if you need to take it apart at a later date.
 

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use kerosene w/ a painters brush to wash the goop out next time. Brake Kleen could dry out/swell the rubber countershaft seal and clutch pushrod seal and they could crack leaking oil all over the place. Just a thought.
 

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I just got a new rear 520 Vortex sprocket (44 tooth) off ebay for $30.
I would like some help on deciding weather or not I should go to a 16 front or keep the stock 17.
I am going up 1 in ther rear over stock, however I'm not sure that will have a noticable effect on performance. If I go down 1 in front how will this combo (16f/44r) change my bike?
I also have a TRE coming as well.

Josh
 

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Jixxer Josh said:
I just got a new rear 520 Vortex sprocket (44 tooth) off ebay for $30.
I would like some help on deciding weather or not I should go to a 16 front or keep the stock 17.
I am going up 1 in ther rear over stock, however I'm not sure that will have a noticable effect on performance. If I go down 1 in front how will this combo (16f/44r) change my bike?
I also have a TRE coming as well.

Josh
You won't notice +1. +2 is a decent start for most. I'd go with the 16T front. It will feel like riding +4 which is a handful if you're not used to it. Do you already have a 520 chain? If not i'd suggest buyin a complete kit from Corey. Go with 16/43 and you can have the 44 if you need it later. Also get a speedohealer or you'll rack up the miles rather quickly.
 

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NOS-Nelson said:
You won't notice +1. +2 is a decent start for most. I'd go with the 16T front. It will feel like riding +4 which is a handful if you're not used to it. Do you already have a 520 chain? If not i'd suggest buyin a complete kit from Corey. Go with 16/43 and you can have the 44 if you need it later. Also get a speedohealer or you'll rack up the miles rather quickly.
Thanks for the info. My stock chain & sprockets are in real good shape, I'm just buying things that I need when I get a good deal on them.
$30 for a black Vortex sprocket is a steal. I can easily sell it for that much if I need to in the future.

Josh
 
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